The Spartan Spin

Preserve the BWCA

+Seniors+Sam+Oosten+and+Cam+Borgh+fish+for+walleye+on+Flame+lake+in+the+Boundary+Waters+Canoe+Area.
 Seniors Sam Oosten and Cam Borgh fish for walleye on Flame lake in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.

Seniors Sam Oosten and Cam Borgh fish for walleye on Flame lake in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.

Submitted Photo

Submitted Photo

Seniors Sam Oosten and Cam Borgh fish for walleye on Flame lake in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.

By Sam Oosten, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






After spending a week in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) I have fully experienced the beauty of true nature. The BWCA is one of the most preserved wildernesses in the United States according to the U.S. Forest Services and is visited by people from around the world. This 1,090,000 acre wilderness area is located in Northern Minnesota and Southern Ontario and includes the Superior National Forest.

This natural beauty needs to be preserved. However, companies like PolyMet do not think so. PolyMet is a mining company in the area and is being funded by Glencore. Glencore is based out of Baar, Switzerland and has had problems in the past with environmental pollution in places such as Peru and Zambia.

PolyMet is trying to get a permit from the state of Minnesota to buy 6,650 acres of irreplaceable Superior National Forest lands for an open-pit copper-nickel sulfide mine. The problem with sulfide mining is that when sulfur is exposed to oxygen it is dissolved and creates sulfuric acid that is very harmful to the area.

The problem is that this mine would be in the  St. Louis River headwaters, The sulfuric acid being released into the watershed will cause irreversible pollution and will kill many of the aquatic life up in the BWCA.

There is the argument of PolyMet bringing jobs and boosting the economy up in the area. Usually, when a company opens a mine somewhere they usually bring their own workers instead of hiring locals. And these jobs would not be permanent. The mine will most likely stay open for 10 years until the resources are gone, and then PolyMet will be looking for more land to mine on.

If we allow PolyMet to tap into the last bit of natural wilderness we have, they will continue to expand through the national forest and destroy the ecosystem.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
The Student News Site of Superior High School
Preserve the BWCA